Logo

Guide to
Mr. Rudhyar's
Gallery

"Fantasy"

Gallery Guide

Home Page

Artists List

Southwestern American Indian Rugs

Southwestern American Indian Pottery

Southwestern American Indian Baskets

Southwestern American Indian Jewelry


Contact
The Starving Artist
Gallery
816-753-3603
e-mail

 

About
"Fantasy"
by

Dane Rudhyar
(born Daniel Chennevière)
1895-1985

Fantasy is behind glass. It has been framed more than once. The work itself is in good condition.

This work has been passed down to me by my mother, Win Allen, the former Mrs. Walter W. Dawley.

It was originally framed by artist Walter W. Dawley, back in 1948. That portion showing within the mat is 10 1/4" X 13".

Ms. Allen could not remember whether Dane himself or Walter matted it. The gray seen around the work is the original mat.

As the pencil sketch beneath the image is visible in some areas, we believe it is a watercolor on watercolor paper. In many places the colors were laid on heavily, which make it, at first glance, appear to be watered down tempera.

The piece is signed in the dark area at the lower right corner. The signature is unobtrusive. You must really look to see it

Another signature, naming the piece "Fantasy" was on the back of the original framing. During the single reframing this piece has undergone, the original backing was removed. However, that portion of the backing with signature, date and piece name is still with the work. In this photo of the signature on the back, beneath the masking tape, you can just see $40, the price the Mr. Rudhyar placed on the work at the time of a art show mentioned below.

In 1948 Walter Dawley and his wife, Winfred opened a small gallery in the adobe house next door to the Oldest House in the U.S.A in Santa Fe, N.M.. During that time they had several exhibits or shows featuring Santa Fe artists, and at that particular time, though not in town much, Dane Rudhyar was considered by locals as a Santa Fe Artist. After one of the shows wherein his paintings were shown along with others, he required some framing. He traded this piece for Mr. Dawley's framing talents. Ms. Allen recalls that under this arrangement Mr. Rudhyar had 3 or 4 of his other works framed.

Though he was at the time considered a Santa Fe artist, Ms. Allen says, "He did not hang out with the rest of the pack, so to speak." So she and her husband seldom socialized with him. During that period, she says, he was a very busy man, always off on a trip to New York or elsewhere. Actually, seldom in town.

Below are a few links to web sites dealing with Dane Rudhyar, but to appreciate the full scope of the man's ongoing influence one needs simply to go to any search engine and type in Dane Rudhyar. There are hundreds of links to his poetry, his philosophy, his theories and so on. He and his written work have a large following.

.Return to TOP of page.
Return To Artist List
Return To Starving Artist Main Page

Web sites dealing with
Dane Rudhyar's work.

Introducing the Lost Writings of Dane Rudhyar

All artwork displayed on this site is copyrighted by the Starving Artist Gallery and/or by the individual artist.
Reproduction of any artwork displayed in the gallery or of any artwork purchased from the gallery without expressed, written permission from the Starving Artist Gallery will be considered copyright infringement and prosecuted to the full extent of the law.